President Trump, whose Twitter malaprops often set off a deluge of social media criticism, was targeted on today for a linguistic misfire involving the phrase “locked and loaded.”

In a series of tweets this morning Trump outlined why he said he had decided to call off a military strike on Iran he had planned in response to its having shot down a U.S. drone.

He said he decided the estimated death toll of 150 would be a disproportionate response.

“We were cocked & loaded to retaliate last night on 3 different sights when I asked, how many will die,” wrote Trump, an outspoken supporter of gun rights and the beneficiary of $30 million in National Rifle Association campaign spending.

 

 

Instead of “cocked & loaded,” Trump probably meant “locked and loaded,” which means to prepare a gun for immediate firing.

Critics swarmed the internet to correct the term, as well as to point out that Trump had meant to say “sites” instead of “sights.”

 

 

Trump did use the proper term “locked and loaded” in August 2017 in saying that “military solutions” were in place to use against North Korea when tensions were high with leader Kim Jong Un.

In 2015, Trump said he had a license to carry a gun and sometimes did so.

 

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